A quick guide on painting

A quick guide on painting

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Here at BBOJ, we know a thing or two about painting. We’ve used all kinds of mixes and have painted all kinds of walls, doors, skirting boards and more besides. The fact is, we’ve applied our paint to pretty much every indoor surface under the sun, and then some.

But where do you even start when it comes to preparing for a basic paint job? How do you know which paint is likely to work out best for you, and how do you know when your walls or doors are ready for coating?

In this quick guide, we will take you through everything you need to know about laying a base for painting in your home, and how you’re going to choose the best paint mix for your walls to really bring out the best in your home.

Sort Out Those Cracks

The process for filling in holes and cracks in any walls really does depend on how big or severe a job you are working with. In any case, before you start creating any kind of base paint, make sure you actually reveal those cracks and dints as best you can.

Try and open them up, first of all, with a gentle Stanley knife or similar. You should then try and dust everything away as best you can.
Then, it’s time for the fun bit – filling it in. The product you use at this stage really is going to depend on the size and scale of the crack you’re looking at. You can invest in putty or deep crack filler as you wish. Polyfilla tends to be a great option, though don’t always go for the quick-setting stuff unless you really know what you’re doing.

Rest assured, BBOJ’s team of painter & decorators has a stack of favourite products lined up which we always roll out when taking on the painting of a cracked or damaged wall. There’s no need for you to invest in any of this material yourself – unless you want to save us a job, of course!

Creating That Base Paint

Your base paint is going to be your first coat. In some cases, you’ll only need the one, and this is pretty much the case for lighter shades or magnolias. However, every painting job is slightly different, as we know only too well.

You’re going to need to consider colour, first of all, as well as how much you’ll actually need. It’s generally a good idea to invest in slightly more paint than you might end up using, as otherwise, you’re going to be pretty stuck.

With any paint, you’re going to need to make sure you give it a good stir around under the lid, and then prep your tools. Painting with a roller is a really good idea if you have a lot of space to cover, but you’re going to need to keep a few small brushes to hand if you really want to get at those tiny nooks and crannies.

Before you even get to this stage, however, you’re going to need to look into the different types of paint available. Yes – there’s stacks of different paint styles out there, so let’s get to work considering the more popular choices.

Which Type of Paint Should You Use?

First of all, let’s consider emulsion, or matt. This is a pretty flat paint, and it’s water based, meaning that on application you’re generally going to get a pretty solid, chunky look. There’s barely any reflection in this paint, and it tends to work best if you’ve got lump walls or surfaces which rise up and down in places.

Eggshell paints, as well as satin paints, tend to go a bit shinier. These tend to be ideal if you’re unsure of whether to go full gloss or full emulsion. Eggshell paint tends to work well on features such as skirting boards and windowsills. It’s a pretty durable paint on the whole but do be aware that it can show off some of the gnarlier lumps and bumps beneath the surface.

Masonry paint, meanwhile, is a little more complex. This can be water based and can arrive in two general flavours – one which give you a little texture, and one which is smooth to a fault. As the name suggests, this paint is pretty good for external work, meaning that you can expect it to be pretty easy to clean – if smooth – but on the whole, really weather-resistant. Generally, you’d probably look at masonry paint for an outside job before an inside consideration.

Final Prepping

We’re not to here to tell you how to actually paint your room – we all go at our own paces – but one thing you absolutely should do is paper, paper, paper. Grab some newspaper or, even better, invest in a waterproof groundsheet, and cover any flooring in the room you’ll paint in. This is especially worth doing if you’re painting a ceiling.

If you want to avoid splashing paint on light fixtures, sockets, and skirting boards, use a bit of masking tape around the edges. This means you’ve got a little bit of protection just in case you get a bit paint-happy and flick splodges all over the place.

Finally, ventilate your rooms. We can’t stress this enough – painting is going to cause a bit of a smell, particularly if you’re at it for a long period, and you’re going to end up breathing more of it in than is likely healthy if you’re using something like a spraying machine. You might even want to wear a painting mask, too, just to protect your face in the process. However, open windows are a must.

Overall, painting is a really rewarding job. It’s a really easy way to transform the look of a room or the outside of your home. If you’re really not sure how to make the most of a great paint job, reach out to BBOJ and we’ll take care of it all for you. Simple!
Call us now at 0208 244 5070 or book online via web form and let us know what you’re looking for

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